Q&A: Artist Jodie Hurt

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I’m excited to share this inspiring Q&A with artist Jodie Hurt. I love her use of vintage imagery paired with bright pops of color and pattern.

1.  When did you begin creating collages? How did you get started?

It all really started a few years ago when I bought a book on altered books.  I found this idea very intriguing and began collecting antique textbooks to work on. I soon found that my short attention span wasn’t conducive to finishing an entire book, so I began working with the individual pages, using them as the starting point for individual pieces.

   2. What advice would you offer others who are interested in creating a more artful life? Have things around you that inspire you.  Collect images that get you excited and thinking about creating. Connect with creative people you admire, talk to them. Look for inspiration in unexpected places … and make things, as much as possible!

   3. How would you describe your style?

I guess I’m trying to reconcile my love of old things with my modern design sensibility.  I adore Victorian engravings, which I use extensively in my work, but I like to juxtapose them with a very contemporary, abstract, environment. I love contrasting the crumbling, old textbook page with vibrant pops of color and pattern.  It’s about finding harmony between the old and the new.

   4. What do you like most about collage?

Collage is like a puzzle to me.  I have all these pieces, images, ephemera, colors, patterns, and I have to figure out a way to arrange them together in a way that is pleasing to the eye.  When the solution comes, it’s a very satisfying feeling, and the result is, hopefully, something beautiful.

   5. What are your must-have collage supplies?

Golden Soft Gel Medium, Cutter Bee Scissors and a rather large table to contain the mess …

   6. What’s your creative process?

 Usually it starts with a particular page in one of my antique textbooks … I like the textbooks because they are written objectively, and I alter them to be interpreted in a more subjective way.  Then I decide on a color scheme, choosing acrylics, patterned papers, or ephemera, to complement it. The last step is to choose imagery and other elements to collage on, and sometimes embellish the surface a bit with more paint or water-soluble oil pastels.

   7. What has been the most challenging part of your journey into art-making?

The most challenging thing? Finding my own unique visual language, then discovering new and fresh variations on it. Also, finding time to create away from my other job as an art educator.  Teaching art makes it difficult to find time and energy to create for myself.

 8. What/who inspires you?

Two artists who I’ve been looking at a lot lately are Eduardo Recife (http://www.misprintedtype.com/v4/) ,  and Kareem Rizk (http://www.kareemrizk.com/). Both are masterful in using vintage imagery in fresh and interesting ways.

   9. Do you sell your work? If so, do you have any advice for others looking to do so?  

The only advice I can give is to do what you love. People will be interested in your work if it shows your passion. Then don’t be afraid to get it out there!

10. Share three random facts about yourself. :)

My batting average in fast pitch softball my senior year in high school was .627.

I was in a car accident in 2001 and now have a Harry Potter-ish scar on my forehead as a result.

My best friend is my husband.  We have tons of fun together, and he is incredibly supportive of me and my artwork.

{Visit Jodie}

*Etsy

*Flickr

Thanks so much for sharing your art and story, Jodie!

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